074: Rocío Valdivia and the global WordPress Community

Ninja Forms LogoThis episode is sponsored by Ninja Forms


About Rocío Valdivia:

Community Wrangler at Automattic. Deputy of the Global Community Team of WordPress.org

Computer engineer by the University of Seville. Started building websites in 2007. Open Source advocate. I love traveling and meeting personal challenges. I specialized in BuddyPress, a tool for developing social networks.

I work at Automattic as a Team Lead and Community Wrangler at WordCamp Central since 2015. Along with the rest of the team, I’ve been co-organizer and mentor of WordCamp Europe 2015-2022. WordPress Meetups mentor and organizer in Seville, Nuuk, Marbella, and three WordCamps Sevilla. WordPress developer and community strategist, responsible for the WordCamp Incubator Global Program, and mentor of WordCamps all around the globe.

Co-author of the book “WordPress para Dummies” (2012). I also speak at conferences and seminars about WordPress, BuddyPress, and Community strategy.

Find Rocío Valdivia:  Rocio.blog | Twitter | LinkedIn


Women in WP | WordPress Podcast
Women in WP | WordPress Podcast
074: Rocío Valdivia and the global WordPress Community
/

Transcript

Speaker 1:

Welcome to Women In WP, a bimonthly podcast about women who blog, design, develop and more in the WordPress community.

Angela:

Welcome to Women In WP. Today’s episode is sponsored by Ninja Forms, a professional drag and drop form builder for WordPress. I’m Angela Bowman.

Tracy:

I’m Tracy Apps.

Amy:

And I’m Amy Masson.

Angela:

Our guest today is Rocío Valdivia, joining us from Spain. Rocío works at Automattic as a Team Lead and Community Wrangler at WordCamp Central. Welcome, Rocío.

Rocio:

Hello everyone. Nice to be here.

Angela:

We’d like to start off by asking our guests about their journey into WordPress. How did you get started?

Rocio:

Ooh, that was a long time ago or at least it feels like that. My journey to WordPress started in 2009. I was coming back from England from working there in an internship, in a university internship, and I started working in an agency in my city in Seville. I remember at the interview, I was a PHP developer basically and I remember the people doing the interview asking me, “Hey, do you know WordPress?” I said, “Nope.” They said, “No worries. You will learn it.” It was like that. I started working with them and it was a great experience.

Rocio:

I was almost five years in that agency as a consultancy. I was a developer, a WordPress developer full time, and I specialize as a BuddyPress developer. That was my door to start contributing to the project because I started making many projects, developing many projects, specializing on BuddyPress, and doing social networks with WordPress basically. I started to report bugs when I could find them, or I started to solve the issues that I was finding and reporting it. That’s how I discovered the community and I fell in love and that was, wow, 12 years ago.

Angela:

Wow. You’re a full-fledged developer then, for real.

Rocio:

Yeah. I studied computer science.

Tracy:

Wow, like for real, real.

Rocio:

Yeah. I studied computer science in university. Yes.

Angela:

Wow. You are probably the only person maybe, I’ll have to go back through our list, of people who actually got a computer science degree for real at the university and came to WordPress as a full-on, the traditional path because a lot of people come to it very non-traditionally. What was your experience before you were with WordPress, with other software and what was your feeling about WordPress, coming into WordPress having been in this other more traditional route of computer science?

Rocio:

Basically, my professional experience after finishing my degree, basically I was making websites in a British company and they used to have public institutions, organizations as clients, but they were doing everything from scratch. We were doing everything on PHP from scratch. They didn’t have any CMS or anything like that.

Angela:

Wow.

Rocio:

Yeah. I learned the hard way basically, but that was back in 2007, 2008 or something like that. It was early times, right.

Angela:

Yes.

Rocio:

At that time, I got a great experience. When I started in this company and I started to learn about WordPress, I realized, I hate… This CMS has everything. Everything I need is already done. Why should I waste my time, right.

Angela:

Yes.

Rocio:

So, I fell in love quite easily, quite fast. My team was amazing. My colleagues were… They were into it for one or two years already so I had great teachers and I learned fast. Yeah, I have not been in other communities actively, but I’ve been in contact with the Drupal community for years because in Seville, both communities, the WordPress and the Drupal ones are very active. I’ve been speaking at Drupal conferences, DrupalCons, two, three times already. I don’t have a big knowledge about other projects but I know the basics basically. I think it’s great because I think the more we know other projects, the more we can learn from them, for the good and for the bad, right.

Amy:

Yeah, that’s a great point.

Tracy:

Agreed. Yeah, even just the thing with so much of the web is, well, when you said, when everything was hand-coded and from scratch, there was so much variation and now more and more things, like Drupal, they have a black editor, we have a black editor. Pretty much every other CMS or something has something similar to that. I see those conversions and I think that’s a good thing because it’s more of a shared knowledge and not a competition because we all have the same goal.

Rocio:

Exactly. Yeah.

Tracy:

Yeah.

Rocio:

For years, I’ve had the motto in my website and in my Twitter bio, I think as well, I don’t know, that the future is cooperation, not competition. I hardly believe that.

Tracy:

I like that.

Rocio:

I think we grow better and stronger when we are together joining forces instead just competing with each other.

Tracy:

I agree.

Amy:

Okay. Say that motto again. I need to write it down because it’s amazing.

Rocio:

Future is cooperation, not competition.

Amy:

The future… Okay. That’s just the best thing I’ve heard in a week.

Rocio:

Thank you.

Angela:

We’ve had so many great quotes on the shows lately but I was thinking we needed a Zazzle store. Something of just T-shirts with the Women in WordPress mottos.

Rocio:

Ohm I would love to see that.

Angela:

Mottos and mugs of all the great quotables from the show. That’s definitely one of them.

Tracy:

Right. The like, “Oh, there just wasn’t anything so I just did it.”

Angela:

Yes. Yes.

Tracy:

“So I just created it.”

Rocio:

Yeah. We need a T-shirt for that. Maybe for WordCamp Europe. Thank you for the idea.

Angela:

Yes. Yes.

Amy:

I need it on a needle point.

Angela:

Oh, yes.

Amy:

I don’t need point, but…

Rocio:

Are you planning to come to WordCamp Europe by the way?

Amy:

I wish.

Tracy:

Yes.

Angela:

Yeah. I am coming up… Amy, because you talked about that in that episode I just edited, I went and looked at my ticket voucher expiration, and I’m like, oh man, I got to get on this.

Amy:

Mine expires April 30th from, because we were all planning to go to WordCamp Europe in 2019? 2020.

Rocio:

2020.

Amy:

Yeah, so I have had two years of credits and they are expiring April 30th. We are planning to go to Portugal in March because June just isn’t going to work so no WordCamp Europe for me.

Rocio:

Oh, they’re not giving you any option to move two months or these three months?

Amy:

I mean I could ask, but my kid graduates from college and…

Rocio:

Okay. Big reasons.

Amy:

Either high school or college coming ahead. My kid’s graduate so there’s other stuff going on, so we’ll see, but probably not.

Angela:

Well, we’ll have to Zoom with you when we’re there, Amy, for sure. We’ll take you around like FaceTime.

Amy:

Well, and I’m worrying because I’m watching what’s going on. Not just here, but in Europe with COVID and the numbers are starting to tick up and I’m like, are we still going to be able to have it?

Angela:

Mm, right.

Tracy:

[crosstalk 00:08:59].

Angela:

Well, let’s think positive.

Rocio:

Yeah.

Angela:

Especially with Portugal, the highest vaccinated country.

Amy:

I’ve been hurt many times.

Angela:

I know.

Rocio:

Portugal and Spain I think are the highest vaccinated two countries in whole Europe and numbers are not getting high there.

Tracy:

I believe that.

Rocio:

Well, the number in high…

Amy:

Portugal is 93%. I was reading it today.

Rocio:

Yeah. 92%. I was reading 90% in Spain. Yeah.

Tracy:

That’s spectacular.

Amy:

Portugal and the United Arab Emirates are tied for the most fully vaccinated countries.

Tracy:

Wow.

Rocio:

Right.

Angela:

That’s amazing.

Tracy:

Yeah, and that’s the thing. We’ve had music events here, but with the requirement of, that you had your pass, was your vaccination card and that has all seemed to really work well. I haven’t heard of any big spikes within, super spreader events from the ones that I have seen that had those restrictions. I have high hopes that just with the right, all right, well, we all just have to do this part. We have to add this extra thing. It’s like getting an extra visa. That’s fine. Just for everyone’s safety.

Amy:

Is WordCamp Europe requiring vaccination for everyone that’s to come?

Rocio:

Well, the global program has defined some requirements for all WordCamps around the world and all WordCamps around the world ask attendees, sponsors, organizers, volunteers, everybody involved with speakers to be fully vaccinated or to be tested negative very recently or to have past COVID very recently basically. All WordCamps in the world have those requirements.

Tracy:

That makes sense.

Amy:

Okay.

Tracy:

That’s great. Yeah.

Amy:

Well, in Italy we had to have our, I was just in Italy last week and we had to have our vaccination card to go into restaurants and to museums and basically anywhere you had to share your green pass. I felt pretty comfortable being there with that in place or you could have had a negative test, but people just get vaccinated. I’m sorry.

Angela:

Yes. There we go. On the topic of WordCamp Central, we, I mean, that is so exciting that you are a WordCamp Central person. Can you give us the inside scoop of what it’s looking like in WordCamp Central right now and what your plans are for this coming year?

Rocio:

Well, first of all, we like to call ourselves the global community team more than the WordCamp Central team, because… It’s okay. It’s okay. Because it’s been used, that name, for a long time. Basically it’s, WordCamp Central is formed by a global team of volunteers and donated people. I’m lucky and privileged to be one of the, that is full-time donated. I’m lucky that Automattic donates my time full-time, but there are many, many people that donates their own time as freelancers or working from other companies and they are deputies of the global community team. Right now, it’s a very, very busy time of the year. It’s a very busy time of the year, basically because we are finishing, trying to finish to define the goals of 2020… 2022, sorry. We are preparing the new global sponsorship program that is going to affect all WordCamps in 2022.

Rocio:

We are very excited because in person WordCamps are coming back. WordCamp Sevilla in person is going to happen in less than one month, now in December in Spain in my country so I’m very, very excited about it. We have three, four or five applications coming in for in person WordCamps in the next year. Three or four of them are in planning stage. We are working to come back to normal. I mean, step by step, bit by bit, but things are getting exciting.

Amy:

Well, I did see the email that WordCamp U.S. is looking for a new city so I’m hoping that in 2022, we’re actually going to have that one in person, which… It’s a little easier to get to for me.

Rocio:

Yeah, the team is definitely working on a venue for, in a city and everything. WordCamp Europe is fully, wow. You can imagine, there is a big, massive team or almost 50 people working hard every day at the WordCamp Europe Slack. They are more enthusiastic and energized than ever. Is super cool. I’m mentoring them. It’s an honor for me to working with them every day.

Tracy:

I can imagine the energy because especially being…

Rocio:

After COVID.

Tracy:

… Delayed for so long. Yeah, exactly. I think we’re all really going along that same thing of that cooperation, not competition. That’s what I feel like in the open source community and especially in the WordPress community. We’ve been cut off at the knees so we can’t have that because some of the best cooperation and collaboration time is when we meet in person. That just surprises us always and contribution days and everything. All sorts of things that I think were really champing at the bit to really, to get back to so that makes a lot of sense, for sure. I had a question though, about…

Rocio:

Sorry, Tracy. I wanted to add one thing.

Tracy:

Oh yeah, no worries.

Rocio:

Just an observation about what you said. Something very interesting that we have been observing in the last months or year and a half now with COVID and everything is that it’s true, we are looking forward to see in person, to see each other in person, to connect in person again, to hug each other and all this stuff. We realized that online contributor days are working really good, even better than in person. Especially for example, I can give you an example. The Spanish community, for example, from WordCamp Spain have organized two or three online contributor days during the pandemia. They were connecting people from Spain and all Latin America of Spanish speakers. We had an increase, a 30% of more, bigger numbers of participation, engagement, contributions. [inaudible 00:16:17] translated for example, or documentation translated or TV, videos uploaded, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera, right. We realize that contributor days online are here to stay for sure or comes online as well if people want to organize them, but those numbers are really telling us something that when it’s well organized, it can be, it can work even better than in person.

Tracy:

I think really, that’s incredible, that increase in that. I could see, and I’ve been seeing just in other industries, they’re doing a lot of hybrid or you have the in person, but then also that online. I think that’s great because one of the things that I do think is a benefit of the online is the people that are in remote places that don’t have a community that’s active and would be excluded normally and that allows more people to access, which is really what I was going to ask about because in Milwaukee, at least we have, historically had a really active community within the city, but not every city has been like that and not every country has been like that so I just, I always want to hear about what is the community like in your city, in your country that you have seen?

Rocio:

The one that I’ve… Well, my local community started to be Seville when I was living there for many years and I started working in this company. We founded the first local WordPress community in the whole country in Spain. It was very exciting. We didn’t know how our meetup was. The first meet up, it was 120 people.

Tracy:

Wow.

Rocio:

Because I think we almost organized a small WordCamp. That was back in 2010 or something like that. Of course, that local community has evolved a lot. It has many, they have never stopped organizing events, even during pandemia, being online, whatever, is being a very, very strong one I think one of the keys of all, any local healthy community is just to have a lot of organizers. When someone has to step down, other people can take it.

Rocio:

The best thing that a leader of a local community can do is to trust, to share responsibility, to share permissions, to share everything and to not have too much in their shoulders. In this case in Seville, it’s been amazing to see how they have organized a WordCamp every year for 10 years in a row. They’re going to be the first WordCamp in person again after pandemia, in December.

Rocio:

By the way, something very interesting that they’re doing is, that is going to be a one day event with three hours of sessions the rest of the day is going to be networking activities because everybody wants to connect. What they’re doing is just organize…

Tracy:

I love that.

Rocio:

Yeah. They’re organizing a lot of networking activities with group dynamics and all of that. They really want to create tribe meetups and things like that to give the opportunity to people to connect with other people. They’re very excite, they have a lot of ideas. They have started a weekly Twitch channel, a podcast. They have a lot of initiatives. They have very, very creative people.

Tracy:

Hey Women In WP listeners. This is Tracy with a quick message from our sponsor, Ninja Forms. Wish you could build forms for WordPress without spending forever or recruiting help? You can. Ninja Forms is the WordPress form plugin that is both extremely flexible and easy to use. Create contact forms, order forms, donation forms, and more in literally minutes using prebuilt templates, easily customized with form logic, upload fields, multi-step pages and more. Just drag and drop what you need, where you need it. Integrate with hundreds of services like MailChimp, Google Sheets, HubSpot, and more without needing to write a line of code. Get Ninja Forms now at ninjaforms.com. Now, back to our show.

Rocio:

About more local communities that I have been involved, I will say that I started and founded the local community Nuuk Greenland, because about two, no, about four or five years ago, I was living for one year and a half in Greenland. I founded a group there because I didn’t know anyone so I wanted to know people of the field and it was a great experience. I met a lot of great people and it was a fantastic experience. Now I live in the south of Spain in Marbella and I’m one of the organizers here. Wherever I go, I join the local community and I like to organize events. I think it’s amazing.

Amy:

It’s time for you to come here.

Rocio:

Okay. Deal.

Amy:

That’s your next location. I mean, you can do Greenland. Why not here?

Rocio:

Yeah. Why not?

Angela:

I think Amy means specifically Indiana, right?

Amy:

Yeah. Yeah. No, Indiana has nothing. We have nothing.

Rocio:

No, the whole U.S., right? Okay.

Amy:

No, Indiana has never had a WordCamp ever.

Rocio:

Really?

Amy:

Yeah. My state is far behind. There’s a couple others, I think, that haven’t either, but we’re one of them. No, I am not going to organize one. That’s not for me, but I love the whole opportunity to network for everybody. I miss networking so much. I miss talking to people in my nerd community. I just, I’m sorry, that’s what I call it. I just miss the opportunity to talk to my friends. People that, all my friends here are all professors and stuff like that so that they don’t really talk WordPress to me and I need that.

Rocio:

Yeah. Yeah. I understand the feeling. I was looking forward to connect with my WordPress friends again as well here. We did the first meet up in person in September and it was just awesome. We had dinner in a square, in a restaurant, in a terrace together, and it was fantastic. Yeah. About connecting with each other on the WordCamp format, from the WordCamp Central team, the global community team is encouraging the local communities to innovate as much as possible with events in the way that… Let’s give to the community what they’re looking for. A lot of people think that a WordCamp have to be sessions, sitting down, more sessions, a coffee break, and it doesn’t have to be like that. Let’s encourage people just say, hey, think about it, look how you would like to, which event you would like to attend to and organize it and make it simple because that’s something that we really want to do as well, is we want organizers to enjoy organizing any WordPress event.

Rocio:

We don’t want people to burn out, to be stressed or anything like that. If a one day event is going to be networking activities, do it. If it’s going to be one long session, teaching people all the new features of WordPress, do it, right. If you don’t have enough funds to do it, don’t give food. Just give some coffee or even don’t do that. Have a break, ask people to go to the corner, have some lunch and come back in an hour. All those things, I think it’s important as experienced contributors of the team, that, to remind people to think out of the box because we can do WordPress events better and this is a great opportunity to reinvent the events, the WordPress events.

Amy:

We have had…

Tracy:

I think that’s important to think of as well, because the whole unconference idea, our camps started out as. That’s really what it was, it was trying to be exactly the opposite of a conference. We do have that flexibility and I think we have, because, oh, well, we have this template that has worked, but I think you’re right. Well, you know what, that might not work or there might be something better.

Rocio:

Yeah.

Tracy:

I really like that. I think that’s a really great point to make.

Rocio:

Yeah.

Amy:

I had…

Rocio:

I would love to see new format, sorry.

Amy:

That’s okay.

Rocio:

I was saying that I would like to see new formats, for example. One of the things that it was a super cool idea, I think it was from WordCamp U.S. I think it was. That it was to have a job fair. That was amazing. I mean, that’s so valuable for new attendees.

Tracy:

I like that.

Rocio:

Yeah. Imagine one event with a lot of, companies could even be doing the interviews or something like that, having their own space and people walking around, talking with the companies and that’s valuable. We will give a lot of value to the attendees and to the users with things like that.

Tracy:

I agree.

Amy:

We had somebody suggest we do a Women In WP retreat where we just take women and we go somewhere like a beach and just hang out and no sessions. Just no sessions. No, you just…

Rocio:

Okay. Count on me.

Amy:

Okay. You just get together, you hang out.

Rocio:

I’m in.

Amy:

We drink wine, we eat great food. We can talk about WordPress. We can talk about other stuff. It’s like the alternate universe. I’m looking forward to a day when this could happen.

Tracy:

Well, I mean…

Rocio:

Yeah. I’m thinking about Hawaii.

Tracy:

… [crosstalk 00:27:08] uses that. They go to a resort and you have sessions there in the pool. There’s two sessions a day.

Amy:

I can’t do that.

Tracy:

I mean…

Amy:

I’m sorry. I can’t talk WordPress in my bathing suit.

Rocio:

Do you know about WordCamp retreats because it existed already in Germany.

Angela:

Oh, really?

Rocio:

I think it was in 20-, there have been two WordCamp retreats already or, I’m not sure if the second one was canceled because of COVID or it was before that, but yeah, it was in Germany. It was called WordCamp retreat officially.

Angela:

Huh. I like that.

Amy:

I like it.

Angela:

I like the retreat. I like when the retreats involve…

Rocio:

And it was a total success. It was, people were so happy. So inspiring.

Angela:

Yeah. Cocktails and pedicures, maybe some massage and just relaxing, a book on a beach.

Rocio:

Don’t tell me more. Take my money.

Amy:

We’re going to need a lot of sponsors. We’re going to need a lot of sponsors.

Rocio:

Just a massage, right?

Amy:

Yes.

Angela:

Just a mass-, yeah.

Amy:

Oh my gosh. We’re going to need some sponsors.

Rocio:

Yeah, I need one.

Amy:

Okay. People, if you’d be interested in sponsoring the Women In WP retreat, please contact us at womeninwp.com

Tracy:

The whole retreat thing, I’ve wanted to do something like that because I’ve found that, again, collaboration. Every time I go to a WordCamp, I’m inspired or I make a connection, but then I get home and I don’t have the time to do it or I don’t just, I don’t have that energy of those other people around so that whole idea of co-working and working together on something, there’s actually was… Back, I used to go to South by Southwest, the interactive portion before it became way too overcrowded, but they, from that spurred a bunch of different organizations, including one that was a tech bootcamp. It was a retreat thing.

Tracy:

I don’t know what they, they had some really weird terminology. They were technology monks or something weird like that.

Rocio:

Okay.

Tracy:

Some sort of kitchy thing, but what they did is they, you applied and a bunch of people came and they worked on solving a real problem. It wasn’t necessarily, it was in Austin and one of the problems were these wild boars. It wasn’t technology related, but using technology to solve this problem of these wild boars that were killing livestock, but then also because they contained disease, they also then contaminating the wildlife and the livestock. Trying to figure out how to do that, but still not be wasteful and be able to use whatever you could from it. I think that’s really a cool idea, is we’ll get a bunch of really smart people together and then have a common goal and see people just flourish with that. I think that would be really fun.

Rocio:

Yeah, absolutely.

Tracy:

Yeah. Sponsors for the…

Rocio:

Yeah, but in my experience, I think that getting people together create great things, but it doesn’t have to be only in person. I’ve seen these in several, for example, working in Spain just a few weeks ago, they were, the same bunch of people were online for four, five hours a day because they really were, it was like the networking room Zoom. It was super busy all the time, right. They were having ideas, they were creative. They were doing super crazy stuff with design and all of that because they were connected three days in a row. Of course, I mean, connecting in person creates a stronger link with each other, absolutely but sharing time together and find the time together, it really makes a difference. Of course, I prefer in person as well, but I’ve seen that online can create special things as well. Yeah. Just, yeah. Just thinking about it.

Tracy:

Yeah. It just, and it is more accessible for people because travel is a privilege and…

Amy:

Absolutely.

Tracy:

… It’s not something that everyone, and even time is a privilege so having that ability to do that, and now with tools, I’ve been using Zoom now for this online teaching basically and using breakout rooms and a lot of these things, there’s a bunch of different tools.

Rocio:

I love that. I love breakout room.

Tracy:

It’s great.

Rocio:

Yeah. It’s the best.

Tracy:

Exactly.

Rocio:

When you have one-on-ones with people because when there is a Zoom room with 20 people and at the end, it’s just the main, the same 3, 4, 5 people talking, but then you do breakout rooms and people start talking and flourishing and enjoying it.

Tracy:

Yeah, you can have that. What I’ve done for my classes is like, okay, well, hey, who is interested in doing this or who is, needs help with this? Who wants to provide help? Being able to make it very specific gave people like, oh yeah, I want to do that so they were very passionate about diving into there. That also helps people really open up, is if they’re really passionate about something.

Rocio:

Yeah. I love it. I love it.

Tracy:

I love it.

Rocio:

Yeah. Me too.

Tracy:

All right. We’ve got a model. We’ve got all this. We’re going to create our new, the new format.

Rocio:

Absolutely.

Amy:

Yeah. I don’t think I can handle planning one of these events, but I definitely want to come to them.

Rocio:

Yeah.

Amy:

I think I can handle planning it. I just don’t think I should do it. Think it’s bad. I am too much of a control freak.

Angela:

But she, if you give her a job, Amy will get it done.

Amy:

Oh, I always do my homework. I mean, obviously.

Angela:

Yeah. She could be on the organizing team without the organizing part. So just tell her, “Amy, we need you to automate this process when speakers apply, dadadadada.” She will make sure your thing runs as efficiently as possible, but it is amazing.

Rocio:

That’s perfect in an organizing team.

Angela:

Yeah, it really is, Amy. We started this podcast a year before the pandemic started and I have to say, this podcast probably gave me the most hopefulness during this whole time, and now I’m going to cry.

Rocio:

Love it.

Angela:

But it’s so true. I mean…

Rocio:

This is Women In WP. Crying’s allowed.

Angela:

Crying’s allowed. No, seriously, look it. I’ve got red eyes, but we’re not going to see this because we don’t post the videos anymore. Just being able to talk to women around the world, all having different experiences but similar experiences and being able to share how things are going. Also just, we would just talk about WordPress sometimes and not the pandemic at all like, oh, life just is going and everyone’s getting stuff done and we have a new friend and so we can make friends in this virtual space but I think, to Tracy’s point in what you were talking about, the breakout rooms and stuff, it does need to be more intimate. It needs to be smaller to make those connections when you’re not in person.

Rocio:

Exactly. Yeah.

Angela:

Yeah, for sure. But I’m really grateful this podcast happened because it’s just this little spark of light every couple weeks.

Rocio:

Aww. I love it.

Amy:

I love actually the times we do get off topic and we’re not talking about WordPress and we’re just talking about life and just connecting with each other as humans and not necessarily as tech bots.

Rocio:

Yeah. Yeah. At the end, we are a community. I don’t know, some of my best friends are WordPress people now. I mean, we create these connections. We create friendships and those ones are friendships for your whole life, is not only colleagues, it’s not only work, right. It’s different. It’s difficult to separate work from personal life many times, at least in my case.

Tracy:

Yeah. Well, if you’re really passionate about it, of course and you find other people that are really passionate about and you’re working for a common goal, what better connection than that. I agree, I’ve made some, some of my best friends through the interwebs and I think that that is something that we saw. Well, we were forced to see, we were forced into with the pandemic because everything did go online, but we also realized that like, oh yeah, we can still make these connections.

Tracy:

Yeah. I’d love to do things in person, but also just having someone around, whether it be on a Zoom call that everyone’s just working together, co-working. Just that, especially when you’re isolated alone with your cat for a year and a half, just that provides some of that human contact that we all crave and need. I think you’re right, that whole thing, the community, that’s what I love about the fact that we’re not just a bunch of developers and stuff like that, but it really is about the tool used to increase the people’s lives. To benefit people’s lives and make the world better. That’s what it is and we’re passionate about that and we just happen to all use the same tool to do that.

Rocio:

Yeah. We create impact. We really create a big impact because every single… I always like to say, and I really believe it. Every single contributor that is helping the project is improving a tool that is making the, is helping thousands or millions literally of people to make their lives. We are like feeding our own, we’re eating our own stock food. I think there is a expression like that, basically. Yeah. Basically, we are helping this project. We’re helping many thousands or hundreds of thousands of people to make their life and I love it. I really love it.

Amy:

Well, it’s been fabulous having you on today. Before we go, first, we’d like to thank our sponsor Ninja Forms for sponsoring this episode. If you could let everybody listening where they can find you online.

Rocio:

Oh yeah. They can find me on Twitter. I’m @rociovaldi. I will share my Twitter username there and I think, and in my site, rocio.blog, as well.

Tracy:

Thanks for listening. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter or join our Facebook group. We would be honored if you subscribe to the show. You can find us on Spotify, Stitcher, Google Play, and iTunes. Finally, if you want to be on the show or know someone who would, visit our website at womeninwp.com. Until next time.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Top